International Idealism

"Let us do something, while we have the chance!"

82 notes

humanrightswatch:

Rich countries, barred doors: Why aren’t the U.S. and Europe more welcoming?
Something similar is happening at the U.S.-Mexico border and on the Mediterranean. In both places, lifesaving and rights-respecting policies are being blamed for a surge in migrants and asylum seekers.
Italy started a rescue-at-sea operation called Mare Nostrum in response to the drowning of 360 boat migrants in October. In the first six months of this year, 65,000 boat migrants arrived in Italy, an eightfold increase over the same period in 2013.
And in the United States, in response to horror stories of the trafficking of children Congress passed an anti-trafficking law in 2008 that provided full hearings for unaccompanied children from noncontiguous countries. While waiting for claims for protection to be heard, they are released to families or other sponsors rather than being detained. So far this fiscal year, more than 57,000 unaccompanied Central American children have arrived at the U.S. border.
These are large numbers, but a little global perspective is warranted. Syria’s neighbors in the Mideast, for example, are hosting more than 2.5 million Syrian refugees. Based on absolute numbers, or on the ability to absorb newcomers as a factor of GDP and population, the industrialized countries do not bear nearly the refugee burden of a Kenya, Jordan, Thailand or scores of other nations.
Read more.
Photo: Young boys sleep in a holding cell where hundreds of mostly Central American immigrant children are being processed and held at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Nogales Placement Center in Nogales, Arizona on June 18, 2014. © 2014 Reuters.

humanrightswatch:

Rich countries, barred doors: Why aren’t the U.S. and Europe more welcoming?

Something similar is happening at the U.S.-Mexico border and on the Mediterranean. In both places, lifesaving and rights-respecting policies are being blamed for a surge in migrants and asylum seekers.

Italy started a rescue-at-sea operation called Mare Nostrum in response to the drowning of 360 boat migrants in October. In the first six months of this year, 65,000 boat migrants arrived in Italy, an eightfold increase over the same period in 2013.

And in the United States, in response to horror stories of the trafficking of children Congress passed an anti-trafficking law in 2008 that provided full hearings for unaccompanied children from noncontiguous countries. While waiting for claims for protection to be heard, they are released to families or other sponsors rather than being detained. So far this fiscal year, more than 57,000 unaccompanied Central American children have arrived at the U.S. border.

These are large numbers, but a little global perspective is warranted. Syria’s neighbors in the Mideast, for example, are hosting more than 2.5 million Syrian refugees. Based on absolute numbers, or on the ability to absorb newcomers as a factor of GDP and population, the industrialized countries do not bear nearly the refugee burden of a Kenya, Jordan, Thailand or scores of other nations.

Read more.

Photo: Young boys sleep in a holding cell where hundreds of mostly Central American immigrant children are being processed and held at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Nogales Placement Center in Nogales, Arizona on June 18, 2014. © 2014 Reuters.

Filed under politics refugees immigration news

779 notes

The minimum wage needs to be a living wage. The business-side discomfort with raising the wage would be more understandable if every sector was hurting. But it isn’t. The rich are richer than ever, corporate profits are at record highs, the stock market is soaring. We don’t need to coddle McDonalds and WalMart by paying their employees less than living wages. But in any case, raising the minimum doesn’t hurt the economy at all. It actually creates more jobs.
Hullabaloo (via azspot)

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

348 notes

The age of entitlement: how wealth breeds narcissism

…Drivers of high-status vehicles were three times as likely to fail to yield at pedestrian crossings. In contrast, all the drivers of the least expensive type of car gave way to pedestrians.

Fascinated by these results, Piff and his colleagues then looked at what created these impulses to bad behaviour. In their laboratory, the richest students were more likely to consider “stealing or benefiting from things to which they were not entitled” than those from a middle-class or lower-class background…

The reason, it turns out, is that even thoughts of being wealthy can create a feeling of increased entitlement — you start to feel superior to everyone else and thus more deserving: something at the centre of narcissism. They found this was true of people who were, in real life, better off. Wealthier people were more likely to agree with statements like “I honestly feel I’m just more deserving than other people” and place themselves higher on a self-assessed “class ladder” that indicated increasing levels of income, education and job prestige. This had straightforward and clearly measurable effects on behaviour.

Well-off people were less likely to help a person who entered the laboratory in distress, unless they had just watched a video about child poverty. In a series of controlled experiments, lower-income people and those who identified themselves as being on a relatively low social rung were consistently more generous with limited goods than upper-class participants were.

Outside the lab, Piff found that the rich donated a smaller percentage of their wealth than poorer people. In 2011, the wealthiest Americans, those with earnings in the top 20%, contributed 1.3% of their income to charity, while those in the bottom 20% donated 3.2% of their income. The trend to meanness was worst in plush suburbs where everyone had a high income, and never laid eyes on a poor person. Insulation from people in need, Piff concluded, dampened charitable impulses.

(Source: downlo, via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

216 notes

shadefire5150 asked: Okay, so does this mean that someone cannot fire someone because of their sexuality?

whitehouse:

This Executive Order does two things: First it formally protects federal employees from discrimination on the basis of gender identity (they’re already protected on the basis of sexual orientation). Second, it also prohibits federal contractors from discriminating on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity in the workplace. Roughly 1 in 5 Americans work for a federal contractor. We still need Congress to act to make sure all workers are protected.

Filed under politics news lgbtqa obama discrimination

71 notes

More Unaccompanied Girls Caught at the Border

thisisfusion:

So far there has been a 77 percent jump in the number of unaccompanied girls caught at the border this fiscal year, according to Pew Research Center.

That’s a drastic increase, especially when compared with the only slight swell in the number of unaccompanied boys who have been apprehended.

image

Broken down further, the biggest difference in apprehensions between the genders happens among teenagers: 

image

The dire circumstances in these kids’ home countries might be to blame. When Fusion’s Jorge Ramos spoke with journalist Sonia Nazario about the dangers children face in Central American countries, she detailed threats of violence and rape.

These types of threats may account for the influx of young girls trying to cross the border.

The flood of immigrants crossing the border has created a humanitarian crisis, with politicians on both sides split over a solution.

As politicians continue to battle it out — possibly without any resolution — Central American leaders are converging on Washington. President Obama is slated to meet with the presidents of Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador Friday at the White House, according to The New York Times. 

During the meeting, he’ll reportedly push the leaders to do all they can to help stem the tide of migrant children coming to the U.S. 

Filed under politics news usa refugees immigration

93 notes

I beg my colleagues to sit down and let’s work this out. Veterans are dying. This is not a policy, academic issue here. This is the very lives of the men and women who are serving.
Sen. John McCain, on the battle in Congress over how much to spend on reshaping the troubled Veterans Affairs Department. Though the House and Senate overwhelmingly approved separate bills in June to speed up veterans’ access to care, they still disagree on the price tag, and it’s unclear whether the legislation will pass in the few days left before Congress adjourns for its August recess. (via latimes)

(via latimes)

32 notes

Why Democrats Now Have a Shot in Georgia - NYTimes.com

In 2005 and 2006, two moderate Democratic candidates, Jim Webb and Tim Kaine, won in Virginia with large margins in the Washington suburbs. Their victories demonstrated that there was a new path to victory for Democrats, one that did not depend on winning Southern conservative Democrats, the way Mark Warner did in 2001.

Georgia might well be moving down the same road as Virginia. No other plausibly competitive state — not Nevada or Virginia, not Colorado or North Carolina — has had a change in the racial composition of the electorate that’s as favorable for Democrats. That’s giving Georgia Democrats hope that they might win a race that they almost certainly would have viewed as a lost cause only a few years ago.

(Source: likethedew, via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)